Image

Mark Steyn

Steyn on Europe

Umbrellas in the Rain

The latest European terrorist attack - by Barcelone wolves - hit a country that made a conscious choice thirteen years ago to opt for a quiet life. So much for that. One of the psychological changes that has happened since the Madrid bombings of 2004 is that Spaniards and other Europeans now accept, albeit mostly implicitly, that this is less to do with foreign policy, or foreign soldiering, than with domestic matters, such as immigration and multiculturalism.

I'll have more to say on this subject with Tucker Carlson live on Fox News on Friday evening at 8pm Eastern/5pm Pacific. Meanwhile, here is what I wrote about the Madrid attacks in my bestseller America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It. I think most of it holds up. The mourners in the streets marched under placards bearing the single word "Basta" - "Enough". They didn't mean "enough" terrorism, but "enough" with Bush's wars and being a fully participating member of the "coalition of the willing". So the Spaniards caved, folded, walked away - and, as they learned today, for the Islamic supremacists it still wasn't "enough":

If the critical date for Americans in the new century is September 11th 2001, for Continentals it's a day two-and-a-half years later, in March 2004. On the 11th of the month, just before Spain's general election, a series of train bombings in Madrid killed over 200 people. That day, I received a ton of e-mails from American acquaintances along the lines of: "3/11 is Europe's 9/11. Even the French will be in." Friends told me: "The Europeans get it now." Doughty warriors of the blogosphere posted the Spanish flag on their home pages in solidarity with America's loyal allies in the war against terrorism. John Ellis, a Bush cousin and a savvy guy with a smart website, declared: "Every member-state of the EU understands that Madrid is Rome is Berlin is Amsterdam is Paris is London is New York."

All wrong.

On Friday March 12th, hundreds of thousands of Spaniards filled Madrid's streets and stood somberly in a bleak drizzle to mourn their dead. On Sunday, election day, the voters tossed out José María Aznar's sadly misnamed Popular Party, and handed the government to the Socialist Workers' Party. Aznar's party were America's principal Continental allies in Iraq; the Socialist Workers campaigned on a pledge to withdraw Spain's troops from Iraq. Throughout the campaign, polls showed the Popular Party cruising to victory. Then came the bomb.

Having invited people to choose between a strong horse and a weak horse, even Osama bin Laden might have been surprised to see the Spanish opt to make their general election an exercise in mass self-gelding. Within 72 hours of the carnage, voters sent a tough message to the terrorists: "We apologize for catching your eye." Whether or not Madrid is Rome and Berlin and Amsterdam and Paris, it certainly isn't New York.

To be sure, there were all kinds of Kerryesque footnoted nuances to that stark election result. One sympathized with those voters reported to be angry at the government's pathetic insistence, in the face of the emerging evidence, that the bomb attack was the work of Eta, the Basque nationalist terrorists, when it was so obviously the jihad boys. One's sympathy, however, disappeared with their decision to vote for a party committed to disengaging from the war. And no one will remember the footnotes, the qualifications - just the final score: terrorists toppled a European government.

So 3/11 proved not to be a day that will live in infamy. Rather, March 14th seems likely to be the date bequeathed to posterity. That's the true equivalent to 9/11, in the sense of a day that defines a people, a day to be remembered as we remember those grim markers on the road to conflagration through the 1930s, the tactical surrenders that made disaster inevitable. At least in the two and a half years between 9/11 and 3/11, there was always the possibility of Europe stiffening itself. Now America lives with the certainty that it won't, and can't, until it's too late. All those umbrellas in the rain at those demonstrations of defiance proved to be pretty pictures for the cameras, nothing more: The rain in Spain falls mainly on the slain. In the three days between the slaughter and the vote, it was widely reported that the atrocity had been designed to influence the election. In allowing it to do so, the Spanish knowingly made polling day a victory for appeasement and dishonored their own dead...

On September 11th 2001, the American mainland was attacked for the first time since the War of 1812. The perpetrators were foreign – Saudis and Egyptians. Since 9/11, Europe has seen the London Tube bombings, the French riots, Dutch murders of nationalist politicians. The perpetrators are their own citizens – British subjects, citoyens de la république française. That's the difference: America is fighting a foreign war, Eurabia is in the early stages of an undeclared civil war.

Who'll win it? In Linz, Austria, Muslims are demanding that all female teachers, believers or infidels, wear headscarves in class. The Muslim Council of Britain wants Holocaust Day abolished because it focuses "only" on the Nazis' ("alleged") Holocaust of the Jews and not the Israelis' ongoing Holocaust of the Palestinians.

How does the state react? In Seville, King Ferdinand III is no longer patron saint of the annual fiesta because his splendid record in fighting for Spanish independence from the Moors was felt to be insensitive to Muslims. In London, a judge agreed to the removal of Jews and Hindus from a trial jury because the Muslim defendant's counsel argued he couldn't get a fair verdict from them. The Church of England is considering removing St George as the country's patron saint on the grounds that, according to various Anglican clergy, he's too "militaristic" and "offensive to Muslims". They wish to replace him with St Alban, and replace St George's cross on the revamped Union Flag, which would instead show St Alban's cross as a thin yellow streak.

In a few years, as millions of Muslim teenagers are entering its voting booths, some European countries will not be living formally under sharia, but – as much as parts of Nigeria they will have reached an accommodation with their radicalized Islamic compatriots, who like many intolerant types are expert at exploiting the "tolerance" of pluralist societies. In other Continental countries, things are likely to play out in more traditional fashion, though without a significantly different ending.

Madrid and London – along with other events such as the murder of Theo van Gogh - were the opening shots of that European civil war. You can laugh at that if you wish, but the Islamists' most oft stated goal is not infidel withdrawal from Iraq but the re-establishment of a Muslim caliphate living under sharia that extends to Europe. There's a lot to be said for taking these chaps at their word and then seeing whether their behavior comports. Furthermore, given that a lot more of the world lives under sharia than did in the early Seventies, as a political project radical Islam has made some headway, and continues to do so almost every day of the week: early in 2005, some ten per cent of southern Thailand's Buddhist population abandoned their homes – a far bigger disruption than the tsunami, yet all but unreported in the world press. And wherever one's sympathies lie on Islam's multiple battle fronts the fact is the jihad has held out a long time against very tough enemies. If you're not shy about taking on the Israelis and Russians, why wouldn't you fancy your chances against the Belgians and Spaniards?

~excerpted from my book America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It.

One hopes the Spanish people's reaction is different this time, but Europeans seem inclined to accept passively that their nominal "compatriots" will kill a few of them in shops, restaurants, pop concerts every couple of weeks, and that's just the way it is; nothing to be done, or at any rate nothing that progressive, vibrant, diverse, multiculti, passive, enervated social democracies can comfortably do - except adopt a sorrowful tilty-headed pose and this week's hashtag (#JeSuisYourTownHere). Please join me on the television on Friday for more on this, but, if you're a Mark Steyn Club member, especially one of our Spanish members, feel free to log-in and share your thoughts below.

from America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It, August 17, 2017

 

Country Matters

As I've said before, I've said it before...

Continue Reading

The Will of the West

President Trump's speech in Warsaw was a remarkable statement from a western leader in the 21st century - which is why the enforcers of our public discourse have gone bananas over it and denounced it as "blood and soil" "nativism" (The New Republic), "racial and religious paranoia" (The Atlantic), and "tinpot dictator sh*t" (some comedian having a meltdown on Twitter). Much of the speech was just the usual boosterish boilerplate that one foreign leader sloughs off while visiting the capital of another. But that wasn't what caused the mass pearl-clutching. This was the offending passage: There is nothing like our community of nations. The world has never known anything like our community of nations. We write symphonies. We pursue innovation ...

Continue Reading

The Great Fire of a New London

No black detail is too absurd for today's world. And so it happens that the first named victim of the towering inferno in North Kensington is Mohammed Alhajali, a Syrian refugee who arrived as a teenager with his brothers in London four years ago and somehow wound up being housed in a flat in Grenfell Tower. Launching a fund to raise money for his funeral, Kareen el Beyrouty, director of the Syria Solidarity Campaign, declared that "Mohammed Alhajali undertook a dangerous journey to flee war in Syria, only to meet death here in the UK, in his own home. His dream was to be able to go back home one day and rebuild Syria." Which is apparently a lot safer. His friend and fellow Syrian refugee Abdulaziz Almashi tells the BBC that "Syria is a ...

Continue Reading

When You're Not Anyone, Any Explanation Will Do

Steyn on how Theresa May squandered her majority

Continue Reading

Therexit?

Mayday! Mayday! for Britain's Tories

Continue Reading

Getting Used to It

An enervated fatalism sets in in Britain

Continue Reading

A Lot More Than London Bridge is Falling Down

Steyn on a Saturday-night terror attack in London

Continue Reading

The New Mancunians

Salman Abedi's very expansive comfort zone

Continue Reading

The Ruin of England

The groupthink in our public discourse is so pervasive it goes as unnoticed as the air...

Continue Reading

"Dangerous Woman" Meets Dangerous Man

Mark on another jihadist bloodbath, and the need to not "carry on"

Continue Reading

The Midnight Train

Reality intrudes on Macron's delusions

Continue Reading

Leading by Example

Mark on President Macron and the barren Eurocrats

Continue Reading

The Wrong People do the Right Thing

A Milton Friedman lesson for the UK's general election

Continue Reading

Macron Bionics

The French and EU establishments, the stock markets and the currency exchanges were rather too quick to advertise their glee. Within nano-seconds of the first projections yesterday evening, the euro rose and so did the Union's princelings, from the absurb President Junkers down, to congratulate their very good friend M Macron...

Continue Reading

Aux Champs-Elysées...

Terror at the heart of Paris

Continue Reading

Who Lost Turkey? (Revisited)

As they used to say in the long Ottoman twilight, the Turk is the sick man of Europe. Following the referendum, the Turk is sicker than ever...

Continue Reading

Mopping-Up Operation

Denial, derangement and debacle in Europe

Continue Reading

Descent into Evil

In Europe, migrants' rights trump children's rights

Continue Reading

Never Mind the Prose Style...

Here's how America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It actually begins. Page one...

Continue Reading

Where the Streets Have No Jokes (cont)

Turkey's sultan Erdogan extends Islam's strictures on free speech to his new vilayet of Germany

Continue Reading

The Late Late Show

The man who introduced the word "Islamophobia' to the western world revises his position...

Continue Reading

The New Man and his Gender Gap

When the chips are down, progressive liberal feminist men won't be there for you

Continue Reading

"I Was Only Good at Enjoying It"

An attack on the section of the airport outside the security perimeter was entirely predictable

Continue Reading

Tomorrow's Civilizational Cringe Today

All the stories are different, and yet they're all the same...

Continue Reading

No Man's Land

Further to my observations about civilizational suicide as a form of moral narcissism comes this stark statistic...

Continue Reading

The Real Containment

Hashtagistan vs the real world

Continue Reading

The Barbarians Are Inside, And There Are No Gates

As I write, Paris is under curfew for the first time since the German occupation, and the death toll from the multiple attacks stands at 158, the vast majority of them slaughtered during a concert at the Bataclan theatre, a delightful bit of 19th century Chinoiserie on the boulevard Voltaire. The last time I was there, if memory serves, was to see Julie Pietri. I'm so bloody sick of these savages shooting and bombing and killing and blowing up everything I like - whether it's the small Quebec town where my little girl's favorite fondue restaurant is or my favorite hotel in Amman or the brave freespeecher who hosted me in Copenhagen ...or a music hall where I liked to go to hear a little jazz and pop and get away from the cares of the world ...

Continue Reading

Manifest Destiny in the New Wild West

Gunfight at the OK Koran

Continue Reading

He Was Just Seventeen. You Know What I Mean.

Is it time for Seal Team Six to save the Mona Lisa?

Continue Reading

The Two Faces of Facebook

This tenth anniversary of the Mohammed cartoons is a glum day for free speech. But that's no reason for some "social media" billionaire not to make it worse. During her visit to New York for the grand UN dictators' ball, Angela Merkel was overheard rebuking Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg for permitting people to post "anti-immigrant" sentiments on social media...

Continue Reading

Last Laughs in Europe

Mark and Mohammed in the Danish Parliament

Continue Reading

The Emperor's Moral Narcissism

Twelve years ago, it was said that the western armies in Iraq would be welcomed as liberators. (They were - for a while.) Today in Germany, another conquering army are being welcomed as liberators - liberators from the residual moral stain of what remains of ethnic nationalism and cultural identity. Watching European news broadcasts right now is like an insane demotic inversion of the Emperor's new clothes. "To a fool these thousands of fit young Muslim men appear well dressed and well fed. But a wise man such as Your Majesty can easily see that they are desperate starving refugees in rags." And so as the trains pull in to German railway stations to disgorge men who meet no known definition of "refugees" they are greeted on the platform by ...

Continue Reading

Taking It

With a migrant tide engulfing Europe, the question remains whether the west can muster the will to turn away from the suicidal delusions of multiculturalism

Continue Reading

Disunion Jack

Further to my note on last week's UK election, Mark Wilson writes from beautiful County Down: Hey there, Mark is of course right when he says that no one outside Northern Ireland cares about the difference between the 'official ' unionists (or their name, since the 'official' went out years ago!) and the DUP...

Continue Reading

St George and a New Dragon

Happy St George's Day to all our English readers, and Happy Independence Day to all our Israeli readers. It's not often they fall on the same day, but it's not inappropriate. Once upon a time, you could find quite a few English flags bearing the Cross of St George in and around Jerusalem, for one reason or another... You can still see the legacy of the Crusader Cross in village high streets up and down England - for the moment. In The [Un]documented Mark Steyn (personally autographed copies of which are exclusively available, etc, etc), there's an essay that starts off in the Middle East, and winds up in the East End: In the "Islamic Republic of Tower Hamlets" — the heart of London's East End, where one sees more covered women than in ...

Continue Reading

Mods vs Choppers

According to Daniel Pipes, "Radical Islam is the problem, moderate Islam is the solution." But what if "moderate" Islam is the problem?

Continue Reading

For Valour

The Victoria Cross is the Commonwealth's highest decoration for valour on the battlefield. Yesterday it was awarded to the first living Briton for action in the Afghan war...

Continue Reading

The Last of England

The new British police state wages war on free speech

Continue Reading

The Sound of Silence

Free speech is in retreat around the western world

Continue Reading

Hollande Daze

The French authorities killed three murderous savages yesterday. That was the only good news on a day in which a third hostage siege began in Montpellier. The bad news started at the top, with President Hollande's statement after the Charlie Hebdo slaughter and the Kosher grocery siege: Those who committed these acts have nothing to do with the Muslim religion. Yeah, right. I would use my standard line on these occasions - "Allahu Akbar" is Arabic for "Nothing to see here" - but it's not quite as funny when the streets are full of cowards, phonies and opportunists waving candles and pencils and chanting "Je suis Charlie." Because if you really were Charlie, if you really were one of the 17 Frenchmen and women slaughtered in the name of ...

Continue Reading

Seasonal Stockholm Syndrome

My column on Britain's and Europe's Christmas holiday without end attracted a bit of pushback from readers across the pond. For example: Oh dear. I do like your stuff normally but this nonsense you have produced about the Xmas holidays us lazy Brits take is irritating crap. Just because the Yanks are good little wage slaves it's not a template. In any event average hours for a full time job per year in the UK are around 1950 for a 37.5 hour week. Most are lucky to get a couple of days for Xmas – many of course work it. Thirty or so years ago one man/woman could work in a relatively average job, buy a house, get a decent pension and send his kids to university. Now both parents have to work their arses off just to keep head above water. ...

Continue Reading

The Reformation of Manners

Rotherham and the multicultural cringe

Continue Reading

Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport

Just about the only part of my career I truly regret was the time I spent at the BBC, who very kindly fired me back in the Nineties. Otherwise, I'd have a lot more time to regret. Notwithstanding two years of headlines re Jimmy Savile, Stuart Hall and others, not everyone at the Beeb in my day was a paedophile - or at least I don't think so...

Continue Reading

Kippers and Curtains

As I was saying: "Ukip — like Nigel Farage's bar bill at ten in the evening — will climb a lot higher yet." And so it did...

Continue Reading

Nigel vs the Lunatic Mainstream

Today Britain goes to the polls to vote in the European elections. Nigel Farage has had a rough ride, to the point where a casual observer might easily assume the election was being fought between Farage's UKIP and a Tory-Labour-Liberal-Media coalition...

Continue Reading

The Churchill Bust

In the new Britain, quoting Winston gets you arrested

Continue Reading

Shooting the Messenger

Who will rid Dutch liberals of this turbulent blond?

Continue Reading

Hath Not a Jew Eyes?

"Neo-Nazis" and "anti-government people" on the march!

Continue Reading

To the Slaughter

Behold the infidels - bystanders in their own fate: Steyn on an act of savagery in a London street - and the appalling aftermath

Continue Reading

The Unfinished Revolution

The picture on the right is from the Nineties, and I'm rather fond of it, because I manage to look both goofy and shifty but Mrs Thatcher's cool is undiminished. I don't know why the harp was there...

Continue Reading

Lars Hedegaard, Defender of Freedom

Steyn salutes a great man...

Continue Reading

'Government Health Care: The Musical' an infectious hit

I scrammed out of London a few days before the Olympics began, but after getting an earful on what the locals make of it. On the whole, the residents of that great city would rather the honor of hosting the world's most disruptive sporting event had gone to some joint that needs the publicity more – Alma Ata, or Ouagadougou, or Oakland. In 21st century London, traffic moves at fewer miles per hour than it did before the internal combustion engine was invented without the added complication of fleets of Third World thug bureaucrats and the permanent floating crap game of transnationalist freeloaders being dumped on its medieval street plan. Nevertheless, having drawn the short straw of hosting the Games, Londoners felt it a point of honor that the city be able to demonstrate the ability to ferry minor globalist hangers-on from their favorite whorehouse in Mayfair to the Olympic Village in the unfashionable East End in time for the quarter-finals of the flatwater taekwondo.

Continue Reading

"FORTRESS EUROPE"?

The Guardian has a report from the Greek-Turkish frontier - or "Europe's border", as a German member of the 175-strong Frontex security team describes it: In 2009 some 3,600 migrants managed to slip across the frontier not far from this market town; in 2010 that number shot up to 36,000, helping explain why Greece has become the favoured port of entry for 90% of illegals pouring into the EU. "They come at all hours of the night and day," said Orestiada's police chief, Giorgos Salamangas, in his icon-bedecked office. "And they're coming not just from the Middle East and Asia but all of Africa, places I have never heard of before." The Guardian being The Guardian, they headline the piece "Fortress Europe". But it's a fortress you can stroll ...

Continue Reading

LETHALLY LEISURED

The last of the 20th century's Big Ideas is dying before our eyes: The sick man of Europe is ...Europe

Continue Reading

THE WORLD THEY MADE

My weekend column is on London ablaze and a society summed up by the relevant chapter title in my new book ("The New Britannia: The Depraved City"). The scenes we've witnessed this last week ought to prompt some serious soul-searching by liberal elites. I nearly said "paternalist," but, as Tocqueville noted, the word paternalism implies that your object is to raise your charges to adulthood, whereas the children of dependency are maintained by government in a state of permanent and increasingly feral adolescence. Are we likely to get that soul-searching? Charles Crawford, sometime NR cruiser and formerly Her Britannic Majesty's Ambassador in various parts of Mitteleuropa, thinks not: The only worse thing than having a problem is not ...

Continue Reading

Image

The Mark Steyn Club

Member Login

Email:

Password:

Not yet a member of the Mark Steyn Club? Join now!

Follow Mark

Facebook  Twitter  YouTube  Join Mailing List

Search SteynOnline.com

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

© 2017 Mark Steyn Enterprises (US) Inc. All rights reserved.
No part of this website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of Mark Steyn Enterprises.